October's top stories: Victorian government's $980m funding, Scotland's QEU hospital

The government of Victoria in Australia has provided additional funding of A$1.38bn ($980m) for public hospitals, construction has started on Glasgow's Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Scotland and NCC secured a SEK625m ($76m) contract to build a new Högland Hospital in Sweden. Hospitalmanagement.net wraps up key headlines from October.


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Victoria's public hospitals get $980m funding in 2015-16 state budget

The government of Victoria in Australia provided additional funding of A$1.38bn ($980m) in the 2015-16 state budget for public hospitals in the region.

The funding will support hospitals in Victoria to meet increasing demands of a growing and ageing population, expand and improve services and care, as well as reduce waiting times.

All 78 statements of priorities with Victoria's hospitals for 2015-16 were published by the government and they outline key priorities and agreed performance targets.

New blood test for heart attack could reduce hospital stays

A study led by the University of Edinburgh in the UK showed that a blood test can more than halve the number of people admitted to hospital with a suspected heart attack.

The test, developed by Edinburgh researchers, measures blood levels of a protein called troponin that is released by damaged heart cells.

It is noted the higher the level of troponin present, the more likely it is that a person has had or is likely to go on to have a heart attack.

NCC to build new hospital in Sweden

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Swedish construction firm NCC secured a SEK625m ($76m) contract to build a new Högland Hospital in Eksjö on behalf of Regionfastigheter in the south Swedish highlands.

Work under the project is expected to begin in February 2016 and will be completed in May 2019.

The hospital will have nine new operating theatres, an intensive care unit, a paediatric and adolescent centre, an orthopaedic centre and a nursing unit.

Construction starts on new Imaging Centre of Excellence at Scotland's QEU hospital

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Construction started on a new £16m Imaging Centre of Excellence (ICE) at Glasgow's Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Scotland.

The University of Glasgow clinical imaging centre is aimed at improving the treatment of stroke, cardiovascular and brain diseases.

The centre will have various imaging technology, including a £7m 7 Tesla MRI scanner, allowing scientists to conduct new clinical research.

University Hospital Wales deploys Vernacare' Vortex human waste disposal units

Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB) installed Vernacare's Vortex human waste disposal units across its University Hospital Wales site in a bid to eliminate infection risk.

The Vortex disposal unit is designed for simplicity and ease of use combined with maximum efficiency, the company said.

The hospital is using Vernacare's single-use urinals, bedpans and other containers, which are disposed after usage in the machines to reduce the cross-infection risk in patient toileting and washing.

Galliford Try wins £72m contract to build East Lothian hospital in Scotland

British construction company Galliford Try secured a £72m contract for the construction of the new East Lothian Community Hospital in Haddington, Scotland.

The company's Morrison Construction business was appointed as the preferred contractor by Hub South East Scotland on behalf of NHS Lothian for this project, with construction expected to start next year.

Galliford Try's facilities management business also secured a £32m contract to provide ongoing facilities maintenance and lifecycle management to the new hospital over a 25-year period.

Central Middlesex Hospital uses ARFI technology to deliver full liver assessments in one day

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Central Middlesex Hospital implemented Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) technology on an ACUSON S2000 ultrasound system from Siemens Healthcare to deliver full liver assessments in one day.

By using this technology, the hospital, which is part of London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, reduced the number of liver biopsies, the current gold standard method for assessing liver disease.

With this technology, patients were able to have a full liver assessment in a single hospital visit, whereas previous pathways could take up to three visits.

Safety a major concern in UK hospitals, says Care Quality Commission

Safety was found to be a major concern in the UK's NHS Trust, with one in ten hospitals and adult social care providers (13%) lacking in this aspect, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) said in its annual report.

In addition, 6% of primary medical services were also found inadequate for safety and 61% of the hospitals required improvement.

Inadequate safety occured from various factors, including a failure to properly investigate and learn from incidents and errors, low staff numbers and staffing mix, failure to undertake safety checks and staff not being able to raise concerns.