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March 2, 2011

Increased Hospital Spending May Not Improve Sepsis Survival

Increased hospital spending at high-cost hospitals is not associated with better survival rates for sepsis patients, according to a report published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine in the US collected data from 309 hospi

By cms admin

Increased hospital spending at high-cost hospitals is not associated with better survival rates for sepsis patients, according to a report published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine in the US collected data from 309 hospitals that cared for a total of 166,900 patients between 1 June 2004 and 30 June 2006.

The median unadjusted hospital average cost was $18,256 per case. Around a third of hospitals exceeded expected costs by at least 10%, with a median excess cost of $5,207 per case.

When costs and mortality were examined simultaneously, 22 hospitals (7%) had significantly lower than expected costs and mortality rates, while 30 hospitals (10%) had higher than expected costs and mortality rates.

The authors noted that hospital spending and adjusted mortality rates for patients with sepsis vary substantially, but higher hospital expenditures are not associated with better survival.

“Efforts to enhance the value of sepsis care could be modelled on hospitals that achieve lower-than-expected mortality and costs,” the authors concluded.

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