Less Invasive Surgery Developed to Correct Chest Deformity

29 March 2010 (Last Updated March 29th, 2010 18:30)

A new minimally invasive surgery technique to correct a chest wall deformity, called pigeon chest, has been developed by South American surgeons. The Nuss technique treats the condition that causes the chest wall to protrude outward, giving the patient's chest the appearance of the bre

A new minimally invasive surgery technique to correct a chest wall deformity, called pigeon chest, has been developed by South American surgeons.

The Nuss technique treats the condition that causes the chest wall to protrude outward, giving the patient's chest the appearance of the breast of a bird, technically known as pectus carinatum.

The technique involves passing a curved bar inside the chest cavity, below the rib cage, to push out the indentation from underneath.

After a period of time, the bar is removed and the chest grows normally.

In South America, surgeons developed "reverse Nuss", in which the bar runs beneath the musculature, but above the ribs, pushing down the protruding section of cartilage.

These techniques were demonstrated at the 8th International Nuss Conference, part of the Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters mission.