Nano-BioChip Detects Oral Cancer

7 April 2010 (Last Updated April 7th, 2010 18:30)

A new test using a diagnostic nano-biochip can help detect oral cancer with success rates comparable to more invasive techniques, a new study has found. According to researchers at Rice University, the University of Texas Health Science Center and the University of Texas Anderson Cance

A new test using a diagnostic nano-biochip can help detect oral cancer with success rates comparable to more invasive techniques, a new study has found.

According to researchers at Rice University, the University of Texas Health Science Center and the University of Texas Anderson Cancer Center, oral cancer can be detected by the gentle touch of a brush on a lesion on the tongue or cheek.

The study, conducted on 52 participants, compared this new test with traditional tests and found that the new test is 97% sensitive and 93% specific in detecting which patients had malignant or premalignant lesions.

Researchers are working to create an inexpensive chip that will deliver results in 15 minutes and differentiate premalignancies from the 95% of lesions that will not become cancerous.

The device will be trialed on 500 patients in Houston, San Antonio and England, which could lead to an application for US FDA approval in two to four years.

The researchers received a Grand Opportunity Grant from the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research division of the National Institutes of Health.