Bioprinter Developed to Treat Burns and Wounds

14 April 2010 (Last Updated April 14th, 2010 18:30)

An inkjet printer-like device that heals burns and other wounds by 'printing' skin cells directly onto the injury is being developed in the US. A laser inside a bioprinter, developed at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, first measures the size

An inkjet printer-like device that heals burns and other wounds by 'printing' skin cells directly onto the injury is being developed in the US.

A laser inside a bioprinter, developed at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, first measures the size and shape of the wound and then applies specific skin cells precisely where they are needed.

Initial results of the device tested on mice showed that wounds heal quickly and safely up to three weeks faster than those that were untreated.

The bioprinter would be mounted on a wheeled frame and positioned over the bed of the patient.

The team will apply for approval from the US Food and Drug Administration to allow it to carry out human trials, according to physorg.com.

The team is also coordinating with the US Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine to produce a device that could be used to treat wounded soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq.