CDC urges healthcare facilities to protect patients from antibiotic-resistant bacteria

3 March 2016 (Last Updated March 3rd, 2016 18:30)

The US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has urged US hospitals to better protect patients against the growing threat of drug-resistant bacteria 'superbugs', which could cause sepsis and death.

CDC

The US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has urged US hospitals to better protect patients against the growing threat of drug-resistant bacteria 'superbugs', which could cause sepsis and death.

The centre has urged healthcare providers to adopt infection control recommendations to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

CDC has examined six antibiotic-resistant threats that include carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE), methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBL)-producing enterobacteriaceae, vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), multidrug-resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa, and multidrug-resistant acinetobacter.

According to CDC data, one out of seven catheter and surgery related hospital acquired infections (HAI) in acute-care hospitals is said to be caused by one of the six antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The CDC is calling on healthcare facilitators and professionals to adopt methods to combat the drug resistant bacteria HAI which include prevention in the spread of bacteria in patients; preventing catheter or surgery related infections and promoting an improved antibiotic use through stewardship.

CDC division of healthcare quality promotion associate director for science Clifford McDonald said: "For clinicians, prevention means isolating patients when necessary.

"It also means being aware of antibiotic resistance patterns in your facilities, following recommendations for preventing infections that can occur after surgery or from central lines and catheters placed in the body, and prescribing antibiotics correctly."

"It means being aware of antibiotic resistance patterns in facilities, following recommendations for preventing infections that can occur after surgery or from central lines and catheters placed in the body, and prescribing antibiotics correctly."

The vital signs report showed that US hospitals have displayed a reduction in a series of bacterial infections including a drop in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs); surgical site infections and catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

The vital signs report assesses the role of the clostridium difficile (C. difficile) bacteria responsible for HAIs.

CDC has also launched a new web application, antibiotic resistance patient safety atlas with interactive data on HAIs caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria to generate a comprehensive data reflecting the superbug / drug combinations showing percent resistance over time.

The US Congress has pledged an investment of $160m to CDC to execute its activities listed in the National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria.


Image: Hospital areas and equipments vulnerable to bacterial infection. Photo: courtesy of Intermedichbo - Norbert Kaiser.