View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter – data, insights and analysis delivered to you
November 15, 2012

UK hospital reports reduced MRSA, MSSA infection rates

The UK-based Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has launched a rapid screening programme to improve quality of care, by reducing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections.

By admin-demo

The UK-based Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has launched a rapid screening programme to improve quality of care, by reducing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections.

"The extended pilot study also revealed a reduction of MSSA bacteraemia rates from 2009-10 to 2011-12."

The hospital conducted an early pilot study of screening emergency patients for MRSA, using a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing method, for 12 months.

The rapid PCR method is designed to allow the hospital to take timely treatment decisions and minimise cross-transmission or acquisition of the infections by providing swift and precise MRSA detection in hospital admissions.

Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust department for clinical laboratory medicine head and consultant microbiologist Dr Achyut Guleri said the rapid PCR screening system allows for timely reporting, supports the clinical decision making process and ensures the maintenance of high patient management standards.

"Reduced healthcare associated infections are associated with significant cost savings that can be re-invested in other areas of healthcare, transforming patient care [on] the Fylde coast," Dr Guleri added.

A pilot study revealed the clinical and economic advantages of using the screening techniques and showed decline in the amount of MRSA bacteraemia present by the end of the study period.

Based on the initial pilot study results, Blackpool Teaching Hospitals extended the PCR pilot screening programme to add MSSA for surgical patients admitted through A&E. The extended pilot study also revealed a reduction of MSSA bacteraemia rates from 2009-10 to 2011-12.

Related Companies

NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Get important industry news and analysis sent to your inbox
I consent to GlobalData UK Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU

Thank you for subscribing to Hospital Management