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February 22, 2015

William Beaumont Army Medical Centre deploys germ-zapping robot to eradicate germs

US-based William Beaumont Army Medical Centre has deployed a germ-zapping robot, which uses ultraviolet (UV) light to eradicate viruses such as Ebola.

By Ranjith Dharma

Xenex

US-based William Beaumont Army Medical Centre has deployed a germ-zapping robot, which uses ultraviolet (UV) light to eradicate viruses such as Ebola.

Using pulsed xenon UV light, the Xenex robot will disinfect a variety of rooms and spaces at the hospital, located in El Paso, Texas.

The 5ft, 2in robot is capable of destroying microorganisms that cause healthcare associated infections (HAI), including clostridium difficile (C diff), methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the Ebola virus.

Infection preventionist and registered nurse Lynn McNicol said: "William Beaumont is the first El Paso hospital to acquire this robot for disease containment and Ebola virus preparedness.

"The Xenex germ-zapping robot provides a safe and cost-effective method to disinfect healthcare facilities such as patient rooms, operating rooms and intensive care units."

"This germ-zapping robot provides an extra measure of safety for both our patients and our intensive care unit staff."

The Xenex germ-zapping robot provides a safe and cost-effective method to disinfect healthcare facilities such as patient rooms, operating rooms and intensive care units.

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The robot is said to work by pulsing xenon, an inert gas, at high intensity in a xenon ultraviolet flash lamp.

It produces ultraviolet C (UVC) that penetrates cell walls of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, mould, fungus and spores, making their DNA fuse, so they cannot reproduce or mutate.

Xenex robots have currently been deployed in 250 hospitals, Veterans Affairs, and Department of Defense (DoD) facilities in the US.


Image: The Xenex germ-zapping robot has been deployed to fight germs at Fort Bliss in the William Beaumont Army Medical Centre. Photo: courtesy of Business Wire.

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