View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
December 9, 2010

Scientists Identify Mechanism of Catheter-Related Bacterial Infection

Scientists from the US National Institutes of Health have identified the mechanism through which catheter-related bacterial infections develop into a life-threatening condition. Scientists conducted research on Staphylococcus epidermidis in mice implanted with catheters to gai

By cms admin

Scientists from the US National Institutes of Health have identified the mechanism through which catheter-related bacterial infections develop into a life-threatening condition.

Scientists conducted research on Staphylococcus epidermidis in mice implanted with catheters to gain an understanding of several types of bacterial biofilm infections.

They identified a specific Staphylococcus epidermidis protein, phenol-soluble modulin beta (PSM-beta), that biofilms use for multiple purposes – to grow, to detach from an implanted medical device and to disseminate infection.

When antibodies were used against PSM-beta, scientists were able to slow the bacterial spread within the study mice, which indicates that interfering with biofilm development could provide a way to stop the spread of biofilm-associated infection.

Similar proteins are found in Staphylococcus aureus , and scientists are planning to study their role in biofilms of MRSA and other bacteria.

Biofilms are clusters of microbes that are associated with healthcare-associated infections involving medical devices such as catheters, pacemakers and prosthetics.

Related Companies

NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Get important industry news and analysis sent to your inbox
I consent to GlobalData UK Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU

Thank you for subscribing to Hospital Management