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September 30, 2010

Microelectronic Device Could Reverse Brain Damage

Researchers are developing a microelectronic device that could help trauma victims regain movement by promoting the growth of damaged neurons in the brain. The device works on the principle that improving communication between neurons affected by trauma can stimulate axons to form and co

By cms admin

Researchers are developing a microelectronic device that could help trauma victims regain movement by promoting the growth of damaged neurons in the brain.

The device works on the principle that improving communication between neurons affected by trauma can stimulate axons to form and connect.

The device consists of microchip which amplifies the signals of neurons in one part of the brain and sends current pulse to stimulate the neurons in other, artificially connecting the two regions.

The device, which is being developed by researchers from Case Western Reserve University and Kansas University Medical Center, remains outside the body, connecting to electrodes that are placed in the brain.

The device is being tested in rats. If successful, the device could be available in ten years.

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