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Piedmont Healthcare in Atlanta, Georgia, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, have selected Global Healthcare Exchange’s (GHX) Case Xpert, an end-to-end supply chain solution for managing and tracking implantable medical devices, to automate their implantable device supply chains.

Case Xpert captures and shares data from case creation to product usage during procedures, creating usage capture capability while validating that the device is on contract for accurate billing, purchasing and inventory tracking.

It is reportedly the first end-to-end supply chain solution for managing and tracking implantable medical devices, including the physician preference items (PPI) used in operating rooms (OR).

In addition, Case Xpert, a software-as-a-service application, provides the ability to transport PPI orders via the GHX Exchange and automate the review and validation of the information on the order.

Piedmont is a five-hospital, 1,063-bed, private, not-for-profit health system, while Vanderbilt University Medical Center is a group of several hospitals and clinics, as well as the schools of medicine and nursing associated with Vanderbilt University.

Both hospitals will use Case Xpert to solve the management of their implantable devices, streamline their costs and to support numerous efforts being reinforced by healthcare reforms.

"Implantable devices are on average 30% of total hospital supply spend, based on the service line mix, and make up 50-80% of the total cost for some procedures, so effectively managing these devices can have a significant impact on the efficiency of healthcare."

Piedmont Healthcare supply chain vice president Joe Colonna said the current implant management processes are cumbersome for both providers and vendors.

"Case Xpert brings the opportunity for greater efficiencies and quality improvement to our operations," Colonna added.

Piedmont Healthcare and Vanderbilt University Medical Center are part of a collaborative team of manufacturer and provider organisations that includes Sisters of Charity Leavenworth, Mercy Health, McLeod Health, Medtronic, Abbott Laboratories and Johnson & Johnson DePuy, among others.

GHX has coordinated this team to help develop an effective implantable device supply chain solution.

GHX chief commercial officer Derek Smith said the company is delighted that Piedmont and Vanderbilt have chosen to automate their implantable device supply chains.

"Implantable devices are on average 30% of total hospital supply spend, based on the service line mix, and make up 50-80% of the total cost for some procedures, so effectively managing these devices can have a significant impact on the efficiency of healthcare," Smith added.


Image: Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. Photo courtesy of SenatorDF.