Pomona Valley Hospital

Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center (PVHMC) in California, US, has become the first hospital in the region to use neurally adjusted ventilator assist (NAVA) equipment with enhanced Bi-level CPAP capabilities for premature infants.

The NAVA equipment, which is controlled by the electrical activity of the diaphragm and transports air through a non-invasive face mask or nasal prongs, enables infants to breathe without a ventilator breathing tube inserted into their lungs.

The 453-bed, acute care, nationally accredited hospital purchased the NAVA equipment with enhanced Bi-level CPAP capabilities through a grant awarded by the Will Rogers Institute Neonatal Ventilator and Pulmonary Grant Programme. 

The Will Rogers Institute’s Neonatal Committee chair and FilmDistrict Distribution president Jim Orr said that one of the primary missions of the institute is to promote pulmonary healthcare issues.

"Because of the success we’ve already had with the technology and the two units that were purchased, the hospital would like to acquire more of the units to provide the best, life-saving care to our tiniest and most vulnerable patients – premature newborns."

"There is no better way to do that than to help Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center with the purchase of this vital equipment," Orr added.

NAVA delivers assistance in proportion to and in synchrony with the patient’s respiratory efforts, as reflected by the Edi signal that represents the electrical activity of the diaphragm, the body’s principal breathing muscle.

PVHMC Children’s Services respiratory manager Marty Sandoval said the grant from the Will Rogers Institute has allowed the hospital to pioneer use of the advanced equipment in the region.

"Because of the success we’ve already had with the technology and the two units that were purchased, the hospital would like to acquire more of the units to provide the best, life-saving care to our tiniest and most vulnerable patients – premature newborns," Sandoval added.


Image: Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center uses life-saving technology to treat fragile, premature infants. Photo: Frankjr0767.