Severe haemophilia A predominant in the US

26 September 2017 (Last Updated October 30th, 2017 17:26)

Haemophilia is an X-linked hereditary bleeding disorder that is characterized by problems with blood clotting as a result of the body not being able to produce working clotting factors, which can have potentially life threatening complications.

Severe haemophilia A predominant in the US

Haemophilia is an X-linked hereditary bleeding disorder that is characterized by problems with blood clotting as a result of the body not being able to produce working clotting factors, which can have potentially life threatening complications.

As an x-linked disease, haemophilia predominantly affects men, and haemophilia A is approximately four times more common than haemophilia B. Haemophilia A also varies in the severity of the condition, with more severe cases being more likely to have poorer health outcomes. GlobalData epidemiologists analyzed haemophilia epidemiology trends in the seven major markets (7MM: US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, and Japan) and found that most cases of haemophilia A in the US are severe, while in other markets mild cases are more prevalent.

Figure 1 presents the number of diagnosed prevalent cases of haemophilia A by severity in the 7MM in 2016.

In the 7MM, GlobalData epidemiologists forecast that there were 41,490 diagnosed prevalent cases of haemophilia A in 2016. Of those, 19,381 cases were classified as severe, while 15,938 were considered mild. In 2016, the US had the highest number of prevalent cases of haemophilia A with severe type among the 7MM.

Details about this forecast and other discussions of the epidemiology of haemophilia can be found in GlobalData’s EpiCast Report: Haemophilia – Epidemiology Forecast to 2026 and GlobalData’s EpiCast Model: Haemophilia – Epidemiology Forecast to 2026.

Related Reports

GlobalData (2017). EpiCast Report: Haemophilia – Epidemiology Forecast to 2026, July 2017, GDHCER151-17

GlobalData (2017). EpiCast Model: Haemophilia – Epidemiology Forecast to 2026, July 2017, GDHCEM151-17