Advanced Odessa Hospital & Clinics (AOHC), a part of the Advanced Diagnostics Healthcare System (ADHS), has opened in West Texas.

This new facility aims to provide quality healthcare in the region, offering coordinated care through its 24-hour emergency room, speciality clinics, surgical suites, and advanced imaging services, in one location.

It claims to deliver comprehensive healthcare services, including a unique Subacute Trauma Program for patients with traumatic or occupational injuries.

AOHC is staffed by healthcare professionals of West Texans to provide concierge-style service.

AOHC CEO Paul Courtaway said: “Over the last few months, we have diligently prepared AOHC with the tools to support high-quality care for Basiners.

“We’re thankful for the unwavering support many of you have shared with us.

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“Courtaway, a United States Marine Corps veteran who served as an F/A- 18 Hornet Pilot, has close ties to Midland-Odessa and understands the importance of community connection and high-touch healthcare.”

ADHS is an independent network, operating hospitals, clinics, and diagnostic centres.

It currently provides care in Houston and Dallas, along with the new location in Odessa.

West Texas recently enacted House Bill 617 to enhance emergency healthcare in remote areas, reported The Texas Tribune.

It focuses on implementing emergency telemedicine in ambulances.

A pilot programme at Texas Tech University employs video calls and wireless monitoring to connect healthcare workers with remote doctors, improving critical patient care in areas with limited hospital access.

The initiative’s first iteration demonstrated its ability to lower fatalities by one third.

Despite funding challenges after initial approval in 2015, the programme has been reinstated with legislative backing, with plans for expansion in rural regions.