US-based John Muir Health has introduced breast cancer screening technology, Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), at its Walnut Creek campus in North California Boulevard.

DBT technology, which is also called 3D mammography, provides better 3D images by minimising or eliminating the tissue overlap that occurs with 2D mammography lesions.

John Muir Health breast imaging services manager Karen Connolly said: "Conventional digital mammography produces one image of overlapping tissue, making it difficult to detect cancers.

"DBT technology provides better 3D images by minimising or eliminating the tissue overlap that occurs with 2D mammography lesions."

"DBT takes multiple images of the entire breast. This allows our specialised breast radiologists to see through layers of tissue and examine areas of concern from all angles."

DBT is claimed to offer accurate pinpointing size, shape and location of abnormalities, in addition to reducing unnecessary biopsies and recall rates.

According to John Muir, the advanced screening technique is clinically proven to detect 41% more invasive cancers.

John Muir Health is a not-for-profit healthcare organisation in east San Francisco, which provides services in Contra Costa, eastern Alameda and southern Solano counties.

The health system includes a network of 1,000 primary care and speciality physicians, 5,500 employees and medical centres in Concord and Walnut Creek.

It provides medical services, including primary care, outpatient and imaging services and is specialised in offering neurosciences, orthopaedic, cancer, cardiovascular, trauma, emergency, paediatrics and high-risk obstetrics care.