Mazor Robotics to supply Renaissance system to Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

15 March 2016 (Last Updated March 15th, 2016 18:30)

Mazor Robotics has received a contract from Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Jersey, US, to supply its Renaissance system for spinal surgeries.

Mazor Robotics has received a contract from Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Jersey, US, to supply its Renaissance system for spinal surgeries.

According to the company, the order represents the third purchase order for Renaissance to date in the first quarter of this year.

The purchase order also marks the company's expanding presence in academic centres and New York City metropolitan area.

"We now have six systems in the US utilising the brain module enabling surgeons and the hospital C-suite to leverage a single system for spine and brain procedures."

Mazor Robotics chief executive officer Ori Hadomi said: "Each is a leading academic centre, so we are addressing one of the largest markets for spine procedures as well as training the next generation of orthopaedic surgeons."

The system, which also includes the brain module, will be installed at the principal hospital of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Mazor Robotics CEO Ori Hadomi said: "The Renaissance system purchased by RWJ also included the brain module, which is primarily used to assist with deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures to treat movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease.

"We now have six systems in the US utilising the brain module enabling surgeons and the hospital C-suite to leverage a single system for spine and brain procedures."

This month, Mazor Robotics announced completion of more than 150 complex spine surgery cases using its Renaissance system.

Mazor's Renaissance Guidance System enables surgeons to conduct spine and brain procedures in a more accurate and secure manner.

The Renaissance system allows contemplation of the course of the surgery in a virtual 3D environment before entering the operating room, which could later be utilised to train the surgeon during the procedure to facilitate greater accuracy.