View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
  1. News
June 3, 2022updated 06 Jun 2022 6:29am

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford receives $100m gift to modernise facilities

The fund will help the hospital to add new facilities to boost the access for expectant mothers and babies in California and beyond.

By Shalini Nair

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation has given a $100m gift to advance the obstetric and neonatal facilities at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford .

With this amount, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation ‘s support of the hospital now totals more than $600m.    

The $100m gift will help the hospital provide better care and fund new facilities to boost the access for expectant mothers and babies from all over California and beyond. 

Opened in 1991, the hospital’s current West building will be transformed with this gift.

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford ‘s West building is situated at 725 Welch Road in Palo Alto in US, beside the hospital’s main building.

 It is claimed to be the only facility in the Bay Area providing obstetric, neonatal, and developmental medicine services all in one place.

Following the redesign, more comfortable patient experience and lifesaving care for complex pregnancies, deliveries, and newborn care are expected to be provided.

Almost two-thirds of expectant mothers at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford are high-risk.

Stanford Children’s Health CEO and president Paul King said: “We are honoured to partner with The David and Lucile Packard Foundation to grow our ability to deliver the strongest possible start for expectant moms and their babies.

“Every year, some 4,400 newborns are welcomed into the world at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford . With this gift, the environment before, during, and after birth will match the already extraordinary level of care.” 

The new layout will increase the size of the labour and delivery unit, adding capacity for up to 20% more births.

 The building will also feature the hospital’s first-ever distinct unit for high-risk moms.

The neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) will have large and open rooms to hold up to ten babies, their parents and care teams, and medical equipment, as well as private rooms where parents can stay with their babies.

 Among the key enhancements include 14 private labour rooms in the new labour and delivery unit, nine private antepartum rooms in a specially designed unit, 51 private postpartum rooms, 64 private NICU rooms, three new obstetric operating rooms.

Related Companies

NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Get important industry news and analysis sent to your inbox
I consent to GlobalData UK Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU

Thank you for subscribing to Hospital Management